Marihuana Medical Access Regulations (MMAR)

Definition - What does Marihuana Medical Access Regulations (MMAR) mean?

In Canada, the former Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulations (MMPR) were enacted in July 2013. The MMPR program was an updated replacement for the Marihuana Medical Access Regulations (MMAR), which was enacted in July 2001.

The MMPR was a set of Canadian regulations that concerned the production, distribution, and use of medical marijuana. While some parts of the law became effective on October 1, 2013; March 31, 2014; and March 31, 2015, the law was struck down as unconstitutional by the federal courts due to the inability for patients to grow their own medicine. The newest act put forward is the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations (ACMPR).

Hydrolife explains Marihuana Medical Access Regulations (MMAR)

The MMAR program of 2001 was intended to clearly define the circumstances and the manner in which access to marijuana for medical purposes would be permitted. It contained three main components:

  • the authorizations to possess dried marijuana
  • the licenses to produce marijuana, which include Personal-Use Production Licenses and Designated-Person Production Licenses
  • access to a supplier of marijuana seeds or dried marijuana

The MMPR of 2013, however, was introduced as the stakeholders were concerned that the MMAR was open to abuse. Thus, the MMPR treated marijuana like any other narcotics used for medical purposes by creating conditions for a new, commercial industry that is responsible for the production and distribution of marijuana.

Under the MMPR, Health Canada has a list of authorized and licensed producers of medical marijuana. In administering the latest ACMPR, Health Canada has two main roles of licensing and overseeing the commercial industry and registering individuals to produce a limited amount of cannabis for their own medical purposes (or to have another individual produce it for them).

While the MMPR of 2013 originally only contemplated the sale of dried marijuana, the new amendments allow patients to turn their marijuana into products such as edibles and cannabis oil.

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