Controlled Substances Act (CSA)

Definition - What does Controlled Substances Act (CSA) mean?

The Controlled Substances Act (CSA) is the federal U.S. drug policy that was set forth in 1970. It states that the use, manufacture, possession, importation, and distribution of certain narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, stimulants, depressants, anabolic steroids, and other states chemicals are to be regulated by the government.

The Controlled Substances Act was signed into law by President Richard Nixon. All violators of the act may be persecuted. The CSA distinctly classifies marijuana as a Schedule 1 substance.

Hydrolife explains Controlled Substances Act (CSA)

The Controlled Substance Act was the monumental statute that established the United States’ federal drug policy. It is composed of five Schedules (classifications). Various substances fall under the distinct classifications.

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) determine which drugs fall under which classification, and if any substances should be removed from the Act.

Since its enactment in 1970, the CSA has undergone nine amendments. Although cannabis is still listed as a Schedule 1 substance and is considered illegal on a federal level, many states have now made marijuana legal for medicinal and recreational use.

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