Myclobutanil

Definition - What does Myclobutanil mean?

Myclobutanil is a form of fungicide. It effectively kills powdery mildew and bud rot on many types of plants such as grapes. Myclobutanil is a common ingredient found in numerous commercial fungicide sprays. It is registered for use on agricultural food crops.

Although the fungicide is considered safe on certain food crops, it poses a danger when used on smokeable cannabis plants. When myclobutanil is heated to a temperature of 205 degrees Celsius (400 degrees Fahrenheit), it releases a toxic gas. Butane lighters heat cannabis products to an excess of 450 degrees Celsius.

Hydrolife explains Myclobutanil

When the fungicide myclobutanil is heated, it releases toxic levels of hydrogen chloride, hydrogen cyanide, and nitrogen oxide. This makes the fungicide extremely dangerous when used on marijuana plants. Despite the dangers, some growers continue to use myclobutanil or commercial products that contain the fungicide. Lately, campaigns against its use have been formed by conscientious individuals in the industry looking to get the word out on this substance.

In order to effectively utilize marijuana, the plant’s material must be heated to decarboxylate the cannabinoids so they are effective. Heating cannabis plant material that has been treated with myclobutanil is extremely dangerous to the user’s health because the marijuana user will inadvertently inhale the toxic fumes from the myclobutanil.

Because of the dangers associated with myclobutanil and other chemical pesticides and fungicides, growers are constantly on the hunt for organic fungicide products that are just as effective, such as UV light and beneficial bacteria. Even then, topical solutions are said to be a last resort for fungal outbreaks in the grow room. Prevention of outbreaks in the first place is what many professional growers focus on.

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