Pesticide

Definition - What does Pesticide mean?

A pesticide is any substance or formulation created, derived, or collected and used with the intention of addressing an unwanted situation (usually on plants, but not always) from weeds, insects, diseases, fungi, rodents, birds, or any other mammalian, invertebrate or pathogen (including germs), or used to prevent similar circumstances.

Pesticides also cover formulations created to affect the growth of plants, the development of roots, or the setting of blossoms or fruit.

Pesticides are a form of pest control. Different kinds include organic pesticides, synthetic pesticides, systemic pesticides, non-systemic pesticides, biochemical pesticides, biological pesticides, and more.

Hydrolife explains Pesticide

Pesticides are usually registered at the federal level and their use is enforced at the state, provincial, or regional levels. Records of their use are required for any commercial establishment growing cannabis or any other crop.

The definition of “pesticide” is very broad. In the United States, pesticides are under the purview of the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with state EPA’s or equivalent organizations generally applying further restrictions within each individual state. The first pesticide law in the United States was the 1910 Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA).

In Canada, the Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) of Health Canada serves the same role in regards to pesticides as does the EPA in the U.S. with the Pest Control Products Act and Regulations (PCPA) serving a similar guiding role as FIFRA. Other international pesticide regulatory agencies include the United Kingdom’s Chemicals Regulation Directorate and the Australian Pesticides, and Veterinary Medicines Authority.

Before using pesticides, it is important to identify the type of pest that needs eradicating, and always follow usage instructions. Some pesticides are no intended to be used on consumable products such as cannabis, so it's important to research what you're buying.

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